Autism and Yakima: What are the needs?

An estimated 700 children in Yakima are on the Autism Spectrum with more diagnosed every year.

That’s 700 children with significant health and developmental needs.

That’s 700 families needing resources, wisdom, expertise and support.

Twelve years ago when Children’s Village came to fruition and again when a capital campaign was launched, services for children and families experiencing autism was a top priority.

Today, services continue to grow, evolve and expand. But more is needed.

Here’s what we know about diagnosing Autism at Children’s Village:

  • The pathway to screening and diagnosis is more fluid than ever before.
  • Diagnosis is occurring earlier and children are entering Early Intervention earlier.
  • 79 children were seen last year through the multi-disciplinary autism diagnostic clinic.
  • 252 children received multidisciplinary autism diagnostic services since 2006
  • The multidisciplinary diagnostic clinic is unique because it is 1 of 6 in the state.

Here’s how the community has come together to serve those 700 children and their families:

  • The Autism Oversight Committee (AOC) was formed 7 years ago by community partners to develop the Collaborative Training Classroom.
  • The Collaborative Training Classroom provided intensive evidence-based programming for young children on the autism spectrum from 2007-2011.
  • 57 Central Washington University Students participated in training around autism since 2007.
  • ESD 105 Special Education Department created an Autism Education Coordinator position and 13 local school districts have contracted for these consultative support services.

We know it’s not just kids who need support. Parents and family members need it to. Here’s how Children’s Village is a resource:

  • Parent to Parent programs began a “Holland” group for newly diagnosed families.
  • The CTC and Parent to Parent partnered for a focused “parent chat” group.
  • Specific parent support groups for autism exist and all community parents are welcome.
  • 72% of the siblings who access the Sibshop program through parent to parent have brothers or sisters with autism.
  • Close to 50% of participants who access the recreation program through parent to parent have ASD.

And more than anything, we know the work is not done. Next Steps: 2011-2012

While significant strides have been made in Washington state,  much work needs to be done in the area of education and training. Some of the specific areas that Children’s Village and its partners are working on include;

  • Thinking creatively about community partnerships and pursuing grant opportunities.
  • Increase community learning around evidence-based practices through AOC.
  • Work with state agencies to promote best practice for diagnostics and services.
  • Promote local education and training in the area of autism.

Autism and Yakima: What are the needs?

An estimated 700 children in Yakima are on the Autism Spectrum with more diagnosed every year.
That’s 700 children with significant health and developmental needs.
That’s 700 families needing resources, wisdom, expertise and support.
Twelve years ago when Children’s Village came to fruition and again when a capital campaign was launched, services for children and families experiencing autism was a top priority.
Today, services continue to grow, evolve and expand. But more is needed.
Here’s what we know about diagnosing Autism at Children’s Village:
• The pathway to screening and diagnosis is more fluid than ever before.
• Diagnosis is occurring earlier and children are entering Early Intervention earlier.
• 79 children were seen last year through the multi-disciplinary autism diagnostic clinic.
• 252 children received multidisciplinary autism diagnostic services since 2006
• The multidisciplinary diagnostic clinic is unique because it is 1 of 6 in the state.
Here’s how the community has come together to serve those 700 children and their families:
• The Autism Oversight Committee (AOC) was formed 7 years ago by community partners to develop the Collaborative Training Classroom.
• The Collaborative Training Classroom provided intensive evidence-based programming for young children on the autism spectrum from 2007-2011.
• 57 Central Washington University Students participated in training around autism since 2007.
• ESD 105 Special Education Department created an Autism Education Coordinator position and 13 local school districts have contracted for these consultative support services.
We know it’s not just kids who need support. Parents and family members need it to. Here’s how Children’s Village is a resource:
• Parent to Parent programs began a “Holland” group for newly diagnosed families.
• The CTC and Parent to Parent partnered for a focused “parent chat” group.
• Specific parent support groups for autism exist and all community parents are welcome.
• 72% of the siblings who access the Sibshop program through parent to parent have brothers or sisters with autism.
• Close to 50% of participants who access the recreation program through parent to parent have ASD.
And more than anything, we know the work is not done. Next Steps: 2011-2012
While significant strides have been made in Washington state, much work needs to be done in the area of education and training. Some of the specific areas that Children’s Village and its partners are working on include;
 Thinking creatively about community partnerships and pursuing grant opportunities.
 Increase community learning around evidence-based practices through AOC.
 Work with state agencies to promote best practice for diagnostics and services.
 Promote local education and training in the area of autism.

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